90 thoughts on “Snow Day

  1. Ha ha ha. I can really appreciate this when it’s 7 degrees F outside although it’s very, very sunny here in NYC. No matter where it is, avid readers will create their igloos. Since I’m from India, where the sun and the heat, not the cold is usually the problem, I can imagine your scenes with the little girl placing herself firmly in the shade of a very leafy banyan tree in the same pose! Thanks for a good laugh.

    1. Yes, that’s Tess! That’s one thing I distinctly remember about New England winters– how very deep the snow was. It would go right over your boot, down to your socks. Always had to wear plastic bags over my feet to play outside. Bleh.

    1. Yes, each scene is created separately, then dismantled so I can reuse the paper for another project. I scan them at a high resolution and prints are available at my society 6 shop, which is linked in the sidebar. I have never sold an original paper cut, though I have sold many paintings.

  2. Nikki, did you ever really do that? I mean, the snow fort is plausible (although, it’s pretty hard to make a snow fort with a roof), but spelling “Do Not Disturb” with pebbles is a bit of a stretch.

    1. Yes. My dad taught us how to build igloos easily and somewhat quickly, and we made dozens of them over the years. As for spelling things with pebbles, is it really hard to believe that a girl who now spends her free time cutting paper into tiny scenes from her childhood would have had the patience as a child to spell things with pebbles in snow? hehehe

      1. I feel like my kids have missed out on all the ice skating I grew up with. It was so magical, each winter. My kids have no idea… but then, they are growing up with beautiful mountains and ocean to enjoy, and wilderness all around. I imagine your daughter will feel the same way. It’s a trade off. ;-)

  3. Hello! this is my first visit and I’m so glad that I ‘found’ you! Beautiful, whimsical, work. I think I might just get lost here for awhile and catch up on The Middlest Sister’s life. I can totally relate to finding the quiet space in the snow fort. My refuge was often the hay barn – I’d smuggle a book in my snow suit and hunker down with the barn cats in cold, rural Ontario winters. Thanks so much. Such a treat.
    Sheryl

  4. I have to wonder, why do adults even do this to kids? If a child wants to read, then……let them. The same goes for writing, drawing, and other solitary-but-beneficial activities.

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